When I was at Eastercon, I had a conversation with David, my editor at Guardbridge books, about book submissions and the process from his perspective. I did a video interview on the subject for my YouTube channel, but there are a few points of advice I thought it was worth highlighting here.

  1. Send Your Book to the Right Publisher

Guardbridge Books publish science fiction and fantasy, usually books that have something a little bit weird or different about them. Yet, I was told that they receive quite a lot of submissions from authors of Christian fiction. I once attended a talk by another editor who talked about how the publisher she worked for, which produced educational books and text books, received loads of fiction submissions despite the fact that their website and information clearly stated they didn’t publish fiction.

If you submit a book to a publisher that doesn’t publish your type of book, it’s a waste of everyone’s time. These days, a lot of publishers accept electronic submissions, but you might also be wasting paper, printer ink, and postage if you submit your manuscript physically. When you’re sending your book out to publishers, do a little bit of research to find out what publishers are likely to be interested. Check who publishes books that are similar in style to the one you’ve written. Don’t waste time sending your book out to publishers that will never in a million years publish it.

  1. Read the Instructions

Pretty much all publishers have submissions guidelines on their website. These include information on how to approach them (inquiry email, sample chapters, full manuscript) as well as information on the formatting they’re looking for. Most publishers like double-spaced, left-justified, 12 point font, and things like that, but once in a while, you’ll come across a publisher that has a particular format they want to see. You’re shooting yourself in the foot if you don’t follow their guidelines.

There are similar variations when it comes to synopses. Some publishers want a 1 page synopsis, some a 2 page, or 2-3 page. Some will ask for 1000 words or 500 words. And so on. When I was sending my first novel out on submission, it felt like every publisher had their own rules for how long the synopsis should be.

You want to follow the guidelines of the publisher you’re submitting to. After all, if you can’t read their instructions, why should they trust you to write?

  1. Proof-read your submission

This was one that David didn’t mention in the video, but he did mention to me afterwards. The submission doesn’t have to be absolutely perfect, especially since editing and proof-reading is part of the publishing process, but one thing an editor is going to do when looking at a submission is think, “How much effort is this going to take to get ready for publication?” A first page that has two or three typos in it is probably fine. A first page with two hundred is another matter entirely.

If the editor looks at your story and it seems like you don’t understand how to punctuate speech or spell common words, they’re likely to think that your book will take significant effort. If your book is absolutely mind-blowing in other ways, you might get away with it, but you are definitely stacking the odds against you. Publishers put a lot of time and effort into getting a book ready to be released into the world, and the more you can do to convince them it won’t be a trial, the more likely they are to be interested in your book.

Check out the video for the other suggestions and comments David had about the submissions process from an editor’s perspective, and good luck with your publication efforts.

Writing Advice: Selling at Conventions

In this video, I offer some advice for selling books at sci-fi and fantasy conventions, a lot of which is also applicable to book fairs, Christmas fairs, village fetes, and anywhere else you might get a table for a few hours to sell your books.

There’s some general advice and tips from my experience. I’d hope some of it, like being nice to people, would be obvious, but it doesn’t hurt to say it.

In convention news, I will be at Bath Comic Con, on 23rd March 2019. It’s in the Bath Assembly Rooms and I will have a table in the ball room if anyone wants to come along and talk to me about books, writing, or fandom in general.

Author Interview: B C Matthews

I’ve done a number of author interviews on this blog, but with this video I was trying something different and creating a video interview for my new channel. As with trying anything new, there were some technical issues, but I know what I need to do next time to get something a bit better. The new channel has a bit of a learning curve and if you have other suggestions for how to improve, I’m keen to hear them.

So here’s my interview with B C Matthews, whose book Riptide I have reviewed in a previous post. I’ve also written a review of the other book we discuss in this interview: Acheiropoieta.

Writing Advice: Prologues

I am trying something new. Instead of a written writing advice post, this is my first video on writing advice, covering the subject of prologues in fantasy novels.

This is my first video of this type, so I’m interested in feedback on how I could improve it, as well as ideas for other topics I could discuss.

The series/books I discuss in this video are:

The Lord of the Rings/The Fellowship of the Ring by J R R Tolkien

A Song of Ice and Fire/A Game of Thrones by George R R Martin

The Kingkiller Chronicle/The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J K Rowling

 

Playing with Mood

I was recently advised to watch the show Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency on Netflix. I hadn’t bothered with this show for a long time because I had never been particularly keen on the book of the same name by Douglas Adams. A friend of mine was very enthusiastic about this show, so I decided to give it a try and loved it.

The story is based around a group of characters, mainly the eponymous Dirk Gently, who solve bizarre cases through a series of strange and seemingly random coincidences. I won’t say much to spoil the plot but I will say that while I enjoyed the first season, I absolutely loved the second season, partly because of a couple of amazing new characters, but also because the story wove in a high fantasy parody. It should be no surprise to anyone reading this blog that I love fantasy, and so I thoroughly enjoyed the fantasy parody world dreamt up in this story.

It is a world that takes itself very seriously indeed, but has knights fighting with giant pairs of scissors, burgers growing on trees, and a series of ridiculous names that I think warrant some of the actors deserving awards for just getting their lines out with a straight face. I had a notion to take clips from this silly parody plotline and try to piece them together in a way that made the story seem like a serious, fantasy epic. This was not an easy task, especially since all the shots of the armies with their weapons looked ridiculously silly, and the wide shots feature a man in the moon, but I had fun with it. Here is the result: The Epic of Wendimoor.

It goes without saying that I’ve been very selective in my use of clips but I’ve somehow managed to make it so that the title character isn’t actually in any of them. So don’t be surprised when you watch the real show and it’s nothing like I’ve made it seem here.

Wicked Girls

I wanted to share this beautiful video that I’ve found. The song talks about various girls in fiction who end up in fantasy worlds, and the video expands with some more “girls who save themselves” from movies.

The song is actually be Seanan McGuire, author of Every Heart Is a Doorway which I’ve reviewed in a previous blog post. The book is about people who’ve ended up in magical worlds and it’s clear that the story and song fit well together.